Posted on Sep 26th, 2006

There are many kinds of daily grinds. In the U.S. Corporate world today, to be busy working 12-16 hours a day is a sign of importance and ambition. The more time you spend at your job, the more you are envied—the harder you work, the higher you rise up the corporate ladder.

Somehow we’ve gotten this work thing all wrong. Originally, work was not intended to be a grind, where we are crushed, pressed, mashed, and pounded into completing tasks and satisfying responsibilities. It was intended to be an object of pleasure, enjoyment, and fulfillment.

The Work Relationship

People play an essential part in any business. The activity they engage in is called work. Work occupies about one-third to one-half of our lives; therefore, we must exercise diligence and care when establishing work relationships.

Diligence is at the heart of the work relationship. Those who work are called employees or workers, and those who manage or oversee these workers are called leaders or bosses. The work relationship is somewhat symbiotic. Bosses and workers co-exist for mutual benefit based upon certain conditions, promises and agreements with one another. As a result, the work relationship can be severed when either the boss or worker takes advantage of or hurts the other. A failure to live up to the agreement will cause the boss to terminate or fire the worker, or the worker to quit or resign from the boss. In fact, employee survey research has consistently shown that the number one reason why workers leave a company is poor boss quality.

Making The Work Relationship Succeed

  • Respect. Bosses and workers must acknowledge and show consideration and respect for each other.

  • Trust. Both workers and bosses must learn to trust so that challenges and obstacles may be overcome.
  • Interpersonal Communication. Bosses and workers are to communicate with each other in ways that promote mutual understanding.
  • Collaboration. Workers and bosses are to cooperate with one another and use collaborative ways to solve problems and make decisions.
  • The Benefit of the Doubt. Bosses and workers are to practice “2S1Q” (slow to speak and become angry; quick to listen), and to refrain from prematurely passing judgment on each other.
  • Finding Happiness In Your Work

    There is more to work than just paying your dues from nine to five working out the daily grind. So, if you’re going to spend an average of eight to twelve hours exerting energy on a task or two, you must find ways to enjoy it! Here are a few:

    1. Choose to delight in your work. It’s important to have a positive attitude towards work and reject a critical and complaining one. This means you must make a deliberate choice to be satisfied with your work. There are no perfect jobs because there are no perfect people. It is unrealistic to believe that the grass will be greener in another department or company. Job satisfaction involves choosing to commit to and be in harmony with your work by consistently carrying out your duties and responsibilities. Remember that work is a prime developer of your character and ability to successfully interact with others in society.
    2. Never stop learning and acquiring new skills. Do your work with wisdom, knowledge and competence by keeping skill levels sharp and fresh. Don’t wait for the company to provide opportunities for professional development. Instead, take responsibility for your own training and career growth by investing time and resources in further education and skill acquisition.
    3. Work smart as well as hard. Hard work can give meaning and purpose to life. When you work hard, you use your whole being—mind, body, and spirit. Working hard includes a total focus of personality, skill, and intellect—all parts of the body working in harmony to accomplish a task. You know that you have worked hard, when at the end of the task, there is a balanced result of sweet exhaustion and satisfaction of completion.

    Do you want lasting solutions to handle stress and maintain successful work relationships? Then re-ignite your enthusiasm for your job, restart your relationship with your boss, and re-invigorate your career.

    Althea DeBrule, entrepreneur and seasoned human resources executive, has focused for more than 30 years on helping people achieve their career goals. Creator of The Extreme-Career-Makeover™ and a founding partner of RADSGroup Organizational Consultants, she is recognized for her bottom line and practical application of career development and management strategies in a way that penetrates hearts and compels action. She speaks and teaches with inspired talent, humor and contagious zeal at management conferences and leadership retreats nationwide, and has been featured in CFO Magazine, Strategy@Work, Human Resource Executive Magazine. Althea is the author of Bosses & Orchards, a compelling and candid book about how to make your work relationship with your boss succeed. To discover how you can take your career to a new level, visit http://www.extreme-career-makeover.com/

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