Archive for October, 2006

Posted on Oct 31st, 2006

"All emotions are pure which gather you and lift you up; that emotion is impure which seizes only one side of your being and so distorts you."
- Rainer Maria Rilke

1. The Law of Time

The highest payment you can ever make in life is the payment of time. Is it worth the limited time you have to hand it over to “stress” so it can mess up even more of your time that you say you don’t waste on “useless things” in the first place?

2. The Law of Willingness

In order to break the chain of stressors in your life you absolutely must be willing to experiment with and accept new ways of thinking, doing, talking, walking, behaving, and surprising yourself further with how the old knowledge can’t stay in your way of success any longer.

3. The Law of Flexibility

A closed-minded 50 year-old person may feel more strain in life then an open-minded 80 year-old neighbor. Who is more flexible? And, it’s not in the age, is it? The more flexibility you allow yourself to have, the more choices you create, the less anxiety and stress can pollute your new and flexible field of expanded awareness.

4. The Law of The Past

The blueprint from your past (fortunately) does not outline your future at all. That is, if you watch it! Planning for and judging your future based on your past may feel like living in “the past” indefinitely. Bring up your dreams in vivid, life-like imagery, sounds, textures, feelings, smells and touches to mastermind a new blueprint that you will change - again!

5. The Law of Resources

Learning and improving yourself every day is truly the only security you have. The more courses in The University of Life you graduate from, the more resources you have to increase your resiliency, awareness, understanding, and the craving to learn even more.

6. The Law of Simplicity

When a human life gets a major hit, the humbling lessons start immediately. Instinctively, we right away go back to the basics. Aim for establishing “Simplicity Rules” beforehand in your life as a prevention/protection against extremely taxing, easily avoidable times.

7. The Law of Change

There may be periods when you feel “stressfully stuck” and see virtually no way of bringing about the solution you need. There are two vital steps you can experiment with.

Step 1: Start quieting your daily life, begin to quiet your mind – learn to use meditation and breathing, go for a walk in solitude; Step 2: Ask questions of your inner mind that knows the answers. With practice, amazing solutions and changes appear like magic!

Lu Smith co-authored (with Di) a unique book. Discover over 367 Master Techniques to outsmart stress effects on health. Receive a Free 7-part e-Course

Posted on Oct 31st, 2006

26 ways to minimize and manage the unhealthy effects of stress, anxiety and burnout.

No doubt about it - we live in an increasingly competitive and stressful world. In many subtle and not so subtle ways it affects us all and it’s not unusual for people to lace their conversation with phrases like ‘Stressed out’, ‘Anxiety syndrome’, ‘Panic attack’, ‘Burned out’, and more. That’s today’s reality.

The question is, how do we go about dealing with that kind of world? What can we do to minimize the prolonged, unhealthy effects of a stressful environment? How can we prevent stress, anxiety and burnout from becoming a way of life?

Well, first we need to take a good hard look at what exactly is stressing us out and perhaps do a bit of repair work on our perspective of the situation. A good way to do that is by reviewing some very basic and constructive advice that has always been available but is often forgotten in our daily scuffle to get ahead.

For the most part, the advice is based upon common sense and can often provide clarity and guidance in stressful situations.

That said, study the list below to see if it contains something that will work for you. At first glance, these suggestions may appear deceptively simple but each will, nonetheless, require dedicated effort and discipline.

1. Don’t try to please everyone. It’s impossible, debilitating and very stressful.

2. Stop living your life according to the beliefs, opinions and prejudgments of others. Its your life, not theirs.

3. Create dependable friendships with people who can be counted on to support your effort to change, learn and grow.

4. Try to make changes gradually. Doing so will help you to maintain a more positive outlook as you progress. Attempting to change too much too soon often leads to disappointment.

5. Establish priorities that are consistent with your own values.

6. Examine your beliefs and goals. Are they unrealistic or unattainable?

7. Accent the positive and learn from the negative.

8. Focus on the present. The past cannot be changed. The future hasn’t arrived yet. That leaves you with now. Now is the time to create the future you desire.

9. Are you a workaholic? If so, try to create a more balanced lifestyle. By so doing, you’ll minimize a lot of stress too.

10. Choose a goal that you can be proud to work toward and which enhances and maintains your self-respect.

11. Don’t forget to take short breaks throughout your workday.

12. Think ahead. Always have a plan B in case plan A does not work.

13. Mistakes happen. If it’s your fault, admit it and don’t waste time and energy with excuses.

14. Take the time to exercise regularly. Exercise is a good stress-buster.

15. Improve your relationships. Give up those that lead nowhere and drain your energy.

16. Pace yourself. Know your limits. If you feel you can go the extra mile and it’s a worthy goal, then go for it…but don’t obsess or overdo. Sometimes, less is more.

17. If a situation or workload appears overwhelming don’t panic. Instead, analyze the problem and divide it into smaller, more manageable parts to be completed in an orderly manner.

18. Trying to be king of the hill is ok so long as it remains a game. When it becomes a stressful, obsessive and competitive desire to win no matter the cost, you’ve got a problem.

19. A little humor can often diffuse a tense situation.

20. Don’t take yourself too seriously. Lighten up…your friends and co-workers will appreciate it and you’ll feel better.

21. Continual worry or guilt solves nothing. Take action by changing what you can, ignoring the rest and concentrating your effort on creating a better future.

22. Choose work that: (a) you enjoy (b) you are capable of (c) produces results that are helpful to and appreciated by others.

23. Get plenty of sleep and rest. Sleep deprivation is a major cause of burnout, stress and anxiety.

24. Listen to soothing, relaxing music that provides the space you need to pause, reflect and regenerate.

25. Unreasonable deadlines can be very stressful. Try to establish a schedule that is realistic and manageable.

26. If a problem or situation is too complex for you to handle, seeking the aid of a qualified professional counselor or doctor may provide the help and guidance that you need.

Copyright © 2003-2005 Channel 1 Records All rights reserved

Bill Reddie is the owner of Channel 1 Records, a company that has been producing music for stress relief and stress management since 1972. Further information regarding the beneficial effects of music and its potential for relieving stress, anxiety and burnout may be found at: http://www.channel1records.com

Posted on Oct 30th, 2006

Is has rained all day here in Tallahassee, Florida. It was raining when I went to bed last night, it was raining when I got up this morning, and it’s raining now as I write this on a Saturday evening. The temperature has hung around forty three degrees all day.

What’s your rain attitude?

A little while ago I went up to the grocery store to do a bit of shopping. I noticed how any different ways people handle the rain.

Some people stay in their car or in the store, as if the rain will hurt them somehow.

Some people decide all the regular rules no longer apply and create their own parking places.

Some couples fight each other for who is going to control the umbrella.

I watched 3 twenty somethings, two guys and one girl, having a great time trying to juggle one umbrella.

Some people continue on as if nothing at all is different.

To me the rain is fun. I don’t understand why people freak out about it. It’s not that much different from taking a shower, just with your clothes on.

When I have my boys with me and they see a puddle, I have to hit it with the car for the splash effect, or else.

The other day I caught myself hitting a puddle and making a big splash.

I was by myself.

It was a blast.

Visit http://www.TheArticleGuy.com for more leading edge tips and tools for writing articles that bring you prospects, publicity and profits. You can also subscribe to our monthly Article Writing & Marketing Tips Newsletter. You are also invited to visit my Express-Start Article Writing Program for more information on the next article writing tele-seminar.

Posted on Oct 30th, 2006

All people experience stress and anxiety in one form or another. Sometimes it can be helpful but if allowed to become chronic, it produces a physically debilitating, unhealthy and destructive mind-set that actually increases stress levels and lowers immune system efficiency.

Generally speaking, helpful stress is similar to a wakeup call that motivates one to (a) do something that needs to be done or (b) accomplish something that is beneficial and constructive. It is goal-oriented and usually contains a promise of material reward or personal attainment.

Another source of stress is that created as the result of unfortunate natural events such as floods, quakes, hurricanes, and the like.

However, in today’s fast moving and competitive world the most commonly mentioned stressful situations are usually those created as the result of day-to-day human interaction.

Since all humans are conditioned since birth by familial, social, religious and other forces, human interaction takes place within the confines of that conditioning. Because of this, the resolution or prolongation of stressful, anxiety filled situations will, more often than not, depend upon how we respond.

Some people become a bit uneasy when told that their stress problems are basically a mental condition. To them, that diagnosis suggests they are flirting with the looney bin and in some manner, displaying deficiency and lack of control.

In their view, stress is something created by someone or something outside of themselves such as a boss, co-worker, dead-end job, traffic, competition, not enough time or money, a dysfunctional family, marital issues, et al. In some cases this viewpoint may be true.

But as the saying goes, "it takes two to tango" which is a rather old-fashioned but still valid way of saying that when stress begins to negatively affect our health and the manner in which we function, we need to take a good hard look at our own participation in what is happening around us.

Granted, we all live in an over-stimulated, stressful world and in the midst of all that, it’s often difficult to maintain a sense of equilibrium. Why?

Well, much of the time, our own perspective gets in the way of corrective action. When trouble brews, we tend to stoke fires rather than put them out by allowing our emotions to inflame issues and influence how we think and act. In other words, we allow ourselves to react in a manner that actually produces more stress rather than minimizing it.

Don’t think so? Here’s a hypothetical example:

Bob works for a company that is going through some corporate downsizing and he has just discovered that a co-worker has been spreading rumors about him that are intended to discredit him in the eyes of management.

He doesn’t want to appeal to management for support because most likely, they will not be pleased with being dragged into what would appear to be a petty employee situation.

He decides to ignore the problem hoping it will go away but soon, word gets back to him that the co-worker is now informing others that Bob is unhappy in his present job and will soon be leaving his current employer for a better position with a competing company. Bob becomes increasingly alarmed and emotional over the unfairness of it all.

Added to that, his anxiety has led him to imagine that the co-worker and a member of management have become a bit chummy of late. That convinces him that management is now actually observing every move he makes and his job must surely be in jeopardy.

He’s irritable, continually on edge, his gut hurts and lately, he’s been bringing the problem home. Not good.

Finally, Bob snaps. He angrily rushes over to the co-worker’s desk and within hearing distance of other staff members, begins shouting and leveling accusations. The co-worker is stunned by the unexpected onslaught but to his credit, maintains a level attitude throughout the tirade.

After Bob simmers down a bit the co-worker quietly reveals information that proves he could not have had anything to do with the situation. Embarrassed, Bob apologizes and wonders who the real culprit can be.

After discussing the matter with his co-worker, it becomes obvious to them both that they have been cleverly manipulated by someone else in the company who had been previously turned down and by-passed for the position Bob now holds. This person had tried to cover his tracks by telling everyone that the rumors were originating from the co-worker whom Bob had confronted (a rather Machiavellian twist, don’t you think?)

Let’s consider how Bob could have handled his problem in a less stressful manner:

Upon becoming aware of the problem, Bob’s first mistake was in doing nothing and hoping the problem would go away. He should have immediately drawn the co-worker aside and discussed the problem in a more rational and less emotional manner.

Had he done so, both he and the co-worker would have quickly discovered what was really going on - and he would have prevented his own conditioning from triggering an embarrassing, irrational and emotional outburst based upon non-factual and paranoid assumptions.

By maintaining his cool, the co-worker was able to prevent further disintegration of the situation. His quiet display of reason and control was, however, an exception to the norm…because in the face of anger and hostility, objectivity often suffers.

When people become the recipients of a verbal frontal attack, the tendency for most will be to respond in kind, thereby effectively fanning the flames. Why? Because just like the antagonist, the recipients are also conditioned, fearful and defensive and more often than not, they’ll react negatively to what they interpret as a personal threat.

Luckily for Bob, the co-worker kept his own emotions in check and effectively brought understanding to the situation by remaining calm and sticking to the truth or facts.

By now it should be obvious that procrastination does nothing to resolve stressful situations. A more productive way is to take corrective and positive action as quickly as possible by applying a few simple but emphatic rules:

1. Search out the facts or truth regarding the situation

2. Do not assume anything

3. Get to the root of the problem!

When stressful situations arise, don’t allow your emotions to dictate how you will respond or react - you could be going ballistic for all the wrong reasons. Observe the facts, remain objective and resolve the problem as quickly as possible. In so doing, you’ll save yourself a lot of future pain and you’ll be much happier and more able to function effectively in a stressful and competitive world.

Copyright © 2003-2005 Channel 1 Records All rights reserved

Bill Reddie is the owner of Channel 1 Records, a company that has been producing music for stress relief and stress management since 1972. Further information regarding the beneficial effects of music and its potential for relieving stress, anxiety and burnout may be found at: http://www.channel1records.com

Posted on Oct 29th, 2006

Stress - whether it’s from the hectic pace of your daily routine or a traumatic life event - can take its toll on your body. Prolonged stress can compromise your immune system, making you more vulnerable to serious illness and infection. If you stress is related to your lifestyle, it might be time to re-evaluate your priorities and slow down a bit. If life has thrown you a curveball, such as the breakup of your marriage or the loss of your job, you may have to ride it out. But, regardless of what’s causing your stress, it’s important to do what you can to counteract its harmful effects. Here are five ideas to get you started:

1. Change your perspective: You may or may not have control over the source of your stress, but you can control the way you perceive it. If you’re on the verge of a meltdown because you’re facing an impossible deadline, for example, ask yourself if the Earth will stop spinning on its axis if you’re a day late. If you’re dealing with a marital separation, acknowledge the pain and sadness, but internalize the knowledge that those feelings will lessen over time. Sometimes a change of perspective frees you to ask for that deadline extension or to feel your sadness but move on through your day.

2. Get moving: Exercise releases endorphins, which are neurotransmitters that act as a natural mood-elevator. If that’s not enough to give you a boost, setting aside time each day for exercise will help strengthen your body to more effectively fight off stress-induced illness. Be sure to make your exercise goals achievable, or you’ll run the risk of adding to your stress!

3. Take a time out: Schedule a period of time each day for your personal "time out." Whether it’s 15 minutes or an hour, block the time on your calendar as you would an appointment or meeting. Keeping your appointment with yourself must be non-negotiable, and don’t dare use your time out to catch up on household chores or read your business report. Spend the time in meditation, read a trashy novel, or create a flower arrangement - whatever will make you feel as though you’ve put yourself first.

4. Nurture your body: Set aside at least one hour a week to pamper your body. Get a manicure or a pedicure, or spend an hour soaking in a bubble bath. At least once a month, consider having some bodywork done, such as a massage, an exfoliation, or other spa treatment. Not only will you be able to soothe away your stress, but you’ll also let your body know that you appreciate all it does for you.

5. Reach out: Stress builds in isolation, so reach out to family members and friends. You don’t necessarily have to share what’s stressing you out - you just need to connect. Knowing that you have a solid support system in place can get you through the most stressful times.

Chris Robertson is an author of Majon International, one of the worlds MOST popular internet marketing companies on the web. Visit this Health and Beauty Website and Majon’s Health and Beauty directory.

Posted on Oct 29th, 2006

According to the StressPulse survey by ComPsych Corporation completed at the end of 2003 and is still valid today:

· Employees in the category of high stress have increased by 15%
· More than 29% of employees come to work five or more times a year when they are too stressed or distracted to be effective
· 63% have high levels of stress with extreme fatigue or feeling out of control
· 32% have constant but manageable stress levels
· 43% lose one or more hours per day in productivity due to stress

The Definition of Burnout

At some point in your career you will experience burnout. No matter how much you enjoy your job there will come a time when you just do not feel like doing it anymore. If you could choose between being sick enough to stay home and not lying about being sick or going to work, you would actually choose to be sick! Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary defines burnout as “exhaustion of physical or emotional strength or motivation usually as a result of prolonged stress or frustration.” Who has not felt stressed or frustrated in life?

The exact causes of employee burnout can vary from person to person. Employee burnout can be caused b the workplace, i.e. lack of recognition or lack of control, by the employee, i.e. unrealistic expectations; inability to set and maintain boundaries, or by poor employee/workplace match, i.e. personal values conflict with job values or lack of skills. Employee burnout is not a temporary situation after a difficult workweek. It is a physical, emotional, and mental state of exhaustion caused by a demanding environment and/or the inability or desire to meet those demands.

Burnout does not happen only to those who are stressed or frustrated. Maybe there are no apparent problems or issues that need to be resolved. Work may seem to be going along smoothly. You get along with your boss, co-workers, and clients. Then suddenly one day you feel a tight knot in your stomach when you think about work. You can’t seem to come up with any new creative ideas. You let your email pile up. You cringe when the phone rings. Yesterday you loved your job and today you hate it. You notice that you feel sick and take more days off to spend in the doctor’s office. What could have caused this to happen? Many of us work long hours because we actually love our jobs. We have work that needs to get done and we choose to spend ten hours a day or more doing it.

Then one day we realize that many months have passed since we had a vacation, a full weekend off, or even a relaxing evening at home. There is no life balance in our lives. The scale has tipped over and we are just mechanically moving through our days. We have less patience and coping with stress is becoming more difficult. Burnout out is caused by imbalance – an imbalance not caused by overwork, but by neglecting personal values. Not balancing the body, head, and heart leads to a misaligned life in which values of work, home, community, personal and spiritual lives collide. Burnout provides an opportunity to stop and listen closely to your body, to your family and friends, and to your heart.

Stages of Burnout

Physical, Mental and Emotional Exhaustion

You may be holding it together at work and as soon as you get home you grab something from the fridge, collapse on the sofa, and remain comatose for the rest of the evening. Does this sound familiar? Doing more with less, having additional responsibility but not enough authority, or juggling with an unmanageable schedule is taking its toll.

Shame and Doubt

You are not feeling confident about the future and you are feeling lousy about the present so you may even start discounting your past accomplishments. You wonder if your colleagues, friends, or family members will detect that something is wrong.

Cynicism and Callousness

In response to that prolonged feeling of insecurity or vulnerability some people feel that there is only one thing left to do – put on the heavy armor and develop an attitude of looking out for number one. In the short run, the strategy often works. This hard exterior can eventually become a burdensome, self-defeating strategy.

Stress has many physical symptoms. Some are obvious while others are not. Obvious symptoms include fatigue, irritability, crying jags, anxiety attacks, loss of appetite or weight gain due to lack of exercise or overeating in reaction to stress. Less obvious symptoms are teeth grinding, increased drug, alcohol and tobacco use, insomnia, nightmares, forgetfulness, low productivity and inability to concentrate. Untreated burnout can lead to health problems such as high blood pressure, headaches, depression, chronic illness and chronic diseases. After an extended period of time burnout can cause physical and mental breakdowns, which include suicide, stroke or heart attack.

Burnout will affect how you do your job. It can show up as poor job performance, absenteeism and lateness, lack of motivation, and poor customer service. The cost of burnout is high to both workers and employers.

There is hope! There are several techniques and tools available to help you move beyond burnout to deliberately living a life on purpose that is balanced, fun, creative, and valued.

Seven Steps To Reduce Stress

1. Pursue the Joy of the Unpredictable

We derive joy from pursuing interests and passions that do not produce any obvious benefits. Unfortunately many people believe that joy should reside in the world of hobbies or retirement. Not so! Do something that gives you energy that resonates with you and motivates you to jump; no, fly, out of bed in the morning. Joy is about surprises and the unexpected. It’s not tranquil and it’s not spurred by attaining material possessions. It’s about feeling the thrill of life. It’s about experiencing moments that you will never forget.

2. Start Liking Yourself

You will find on the outside only what you possess on the inside. Deep down most of us do not have a lot of self-respect. Use your downtime to fix whatever problems keep you from following the best track. Self-discovery and self-improvement are a good start. As a result, improved self-respect often produces better jobs, better outlooks, and better lives.

3. Spend Time with Family and Friends

We tend to hide both physically and emotionally from loved ones and colleagues when we are burned out. We feel embarrassed because we are always canceling commitments or making excuses why we cannot commit. Instead of using downtime to reconnect with loved ones, we wallow in quit. It is too easy to get caught up in our work. It is too easy to treasure our trash and trash ourselves. We may feel important at work but we are only truly valued when we are with family and friends. We can be replaced at work. Our friends and family stick with us.

Burnout may be reserved for people who have more choices than they appreciate. It is an early warning system that can help us get back on track. Burnout may just bring with it a more satisfying life for you, your family, and your future employer. Listen to the disappointments, the sadness, and the regrets from your family and friends. There is truth behind the emotion that is calling to you.

4. Change the Way You Look at Stress

One way to change stress is to change the way in which we interpret any stressful event. We change how we interpret an event by changing how we think about the event. Instead of saying, “I can’t do this, it won’t work out”, try saying “I will break this project down into small steps and talk with my manager later to negotiate more time.” Even slightly changing how we choose to evaluate an event will greatly decrease the amount of burnout we feel. Try to eliminate words and phrases such as ‘Hate”, “can’t stand it”, “no way”, etc. Make a list of those negative words or phrases that you most often use, and then flag them each time they are said and replace them with a more neutral word or phrase.

5. Build Your Personal Foundation

The personal foundation process involves deliberately investing in one’s self. A strong personal foundation includes 10 distinct stepping stones which, when linked together, provide a solid yet personalized base on which to build one’s life. In a world that sometimes appears to be built on quicksand, we all need a personal foundation base. This includes some foundational components such as reduce and eliminate tolerations in your life, simplify, create and use daily habits, creating reserves, and reorient around your values. If you cannot manage this on your own, I recommend finding a personal or life coach to help you in the process.

6. Work to Have Fun at Work and Build Creativity into Your Day

You do not need to throw a party to have fun at work. You can have fun by talking to a co-worker, listening to music, or by just increasing those tasks that you enjoy at work. Attempt to complete tasks that you do not enjoy right away so you do not think about them all day. Check with your manager to see if you can eliminate or delegate these tasks to someone else. If you honestly cannot find anything you enjoy about your work, you might not be experiencing burnout at all, but a true feeling of needing a new job. This might be a good time to do some self-discovery work, take a career assessment, or hire a career coach.

If you go in the same door everyday, sit at the same desk, and start the day off with the same phone calls, a routine can easily lead to boredom. Add some job creativity to your day. For example ask to change your start time, redecorate your office or cubicle, or ask to take on some new tasks that you enjoy. Do not ask to take on additional busy work. It is far more important to ask to take on a new assignment that will fuel your creativity, add interest to your day, and give you positive feelings.

7. Ask for Some Control in Your Job

If you need permission to take control, ask your employer to take a risk by allowing you to take control over your job for one week to see if production increases. If they do not allow you to take full control, ask for control over one small aspect of your job. They slowly ask for more and more until you have as much as you want.

How to Stay Motivated and Live in Balance

· Honor your own values – 365 days a year/24 hours a day
· Live life authentically
· Appreciate and acknowledge who you are – NOT what you do
· Become more conscious about how you are with others
· Access your heart to help you manage the feelings of stress and manage burnout
· You do have a choice about how you feel
· Get help when you need it

Deborah DePorter, CPCC, RCC Licensed HeartMath Stress Management Consultant and Coach Author: Get Your Life Back Today: Overcoming Chronic Illness One Day at a Time C.H.A.N.G.E. Associates, LLC P.O. Box 650338 Potomac Falls, VA 20165 571-276-5528 - E-Mail: deb@stressmanagementarticles.com http://www.changeassociatescoaching.com http://www.getyourlifebacktoday.com

Posted on Oct 28th, 2006

Stress management in the workplace is a reality that most of us have to face for one reason or another and coping with it is key to long-term career success.

Some careers are more stressful than others and some companies and managers you work for might provide you with more stress than you’d otherwise like.

Having some stress can be helpful because it can provide motivation that allows you to work with a bit of a sense of urgency and purpose.

When stress in the workplace reaches a high level and carries over to your personal life in a negative way though, this is a sign that you need to do something to properly manage it so that it doesn’t spiral out of control further.

Here are some suggestions for successful stress management in the workplace:

    1. Try to address issues that might be affecting your stress level that you might not readily think of, especially the ones you can change. Do you drive 1 hour to work each day and feel beaten up by the time you get into the office each morning? Are there ways you can lighten your workload? Do you need to learn how to say “no” to certain requests from time to time? Look for ways of changing how you to things especially ones you have some control over.

    2. Look for ways to improve your time management. Often, stress is a result of simply not having enough time to complete everything you need to do. Stop wasting time talking with colleagues and making personal phone calls, stop surfing the Internet for personal reasons, and eliminate other time wasters. Shut your office door if you have trouble with people walking in and distracting you or find a quiet office where you can work undisturbed if necessary.

    3. Find some sort of athletic endeavor to take part in. I like working out at the gym but you might find jogging, playing squash or taking yoga classes will help. Try something athletic that gets your mind off work. Start by going for a walk at lunchtime just to get out of the office for a bit.

    4. Don’t neglect your personal life. Remember to try to find the proper balance between your work life and your work outside of work. Try when possible to leave work at work. A separation between work and personal life is paramount.

    5. Carefully consider whether or not you are in the right job. If successful stress management at work is just not possible and if you yearn for your time with a previous employer when things were better, maybe you’re in the wrong job. Do you like what do you or is it simply a job to you? If it’s simply a job there might be other jobs that are less stressful that are better suited to your personality. Stress management in the workplace is critical to your long-term career and long-term health. When stress management is simply not achievable through change, consider consulting a doctor for a medical opinion in case you are suffering from more than just stress.

    Carl Mueller is an Internet entrepreneur and professional recruiter who wants to help you find your dream career.

    Visit Carl’s website to separate yourself from other job searchers: http://www.find-your-dream-career.com

    Sign up for The Effective Career Planner, Carl’s free 5-day course: http://www.find-your-dream-career.com/effective-career-planner.html

    Ezine editors/Webmasters: Please feel free to reprint this article in its entirety in your ezine or on your website. Please don’t change any of the content and please ensure that you include the above bio that shows my website URL. If you would like me to address any specific career topics in future articles, please let me know.

    Posted on Oct 28th, 2006

    We strive for excellence in our lives, going at full throttle, but sometimes we are faced with a situation where all we do is "hurry up and wait".

    That’s when we need to learn about coping.

    C is for Conscious.

    Conscious slowing down is required here, as we take stock of what is really happening in our life. It is not like tuning out, we are fully aware that we are in the moment and observing ourselves, as it were. Life has hit us with something sudden and usually it is somsthing, unpleasant or unwanted, such as divorce, death of a loved one or a job loss.

    O.Opt-in.

    Opt-in to the process in your time and at your own pace. Again this does not mean "zoning out", as the kids today say. It means that you will face the situation in your own personal style. Do you need to be alone to cry, meditate, do some journaling? Are your friends and family what you need? Say so!

    P.Participate.

    This is much like opting in, however, where the former one is more an attitude the latter is more hands on. Take part in your eventual re-emergence this issue or event. Again, at your pace. If you feel you are not ready to see a certain person or attend a function, make a courteous refusal. You can explain that you don’t feel up to it, but would like to be asked again in the future.

    I.Involved.

    Your ongoing involvement is a big part of the coping process. There will be steps that you must go through that will taking you closer to coming out on the other side of the experience. It’s more beneficial for you to take small,timely, forward moving steps than to make huge leaps and then have to retreat or re-start.

    N.Negotiate.

    Negotiate with yourself or your support circle for things you need help with. If there children depending on you at this time, there are things others can do for you, so you can have more strength and focus to provide the relative stabilty that the children will need. Can someone shop for groceries, so that you can pick up the kids from school? Maybe that’s all you can manage for the day. Get help preparing meals, doing laundry, etc. Some of us find it very hard to ask for help, but using your energy wisely is a must, if you are to recover your "old" self.

    G.Gratitude.

    Gratitude is important for so many reasons. It shows acknowledgement and appreciation, with no regard for the magnitude or humbleness of the gift, it’s enough that it was given. So thank everyone for their help during your challenging time. Don’t be driven to try to "pay" them back! A sincere, heart-felt thanks with a well chosen card is enough. They"ll be happy just to have the old you back. Gratitude for the lesson to be learned in the crisis may take a long time. But that may eventually come. For now you’ve survived and your alive with possibilities…again!

    Yvonne is the one who her family, friends and customers turn to for great skin care advice and product recommendations.

    Please visit her website at: http://www.freewebs.com/herbalhealthyskin/self-improvement.htm

    Posted on Oct 27th, 2006

    If you reach a point where you feel you can’t take it anymore, you’ve arrived—at a point of overwhelm that pop psychology refers to as “burnout.” It is a point of emotional exhaustion, mental confusion, and even physical fatigue.

    The word itself originated from a description of a busted light bulb.

    However, while you can’t do anything about a light bulb that won’t work anymore, there is plenty that you can do with psychological overwhelm. You might even say that unlike a light bulb, a human being is a self-renewing system.

    Here are seven simple remedies to renew your mind, body, and soul.

    One. Step out into nature. Go to the mountains, the forest, or the ocean. And if you’re really strapped for natural resources, go to a local park. I’m not sure how this works, but when you spend a sufficient amount of time in nature, you feel rejuvenated and your mind comes up with fresh ideas on how to cope with your pressing situation.

    Two. Reframe. If you feel stressed because you are doing a task that you dislike, use your imagination to make it more enjoyable. For example, if you’re raking leaves, and you just hate gardening, then imagine that you’re raking in money, and that each leaf represents a hundred dollar bill. This will actually spark creative ideas in your mind on how you can improve your income.

    Three. Energize. Go to a health-food store and get an energy supplement. Vitamins, minerals, and herbs can help your metabolism recuperate from the stress. Most health-food stores have someone to assist you, as well as reference books and videos on what to take for your particular condition.

    Four. Introspect. In a notebook, write down everything that bothers you until you can come up with a way that you can change the situation. Start with a question. “What can I do about…?” Then keep writing until you come up with an answer. I once did this for two hours and came up with a new model on how I could radically improve every aspect of my life.

    Five. Try music. Listen to beautiful, serene, uplifting music. Don’t do anything else as you listen to the music—or you’ll simply find a way to tune it out. Listen to every note, every word sung, and every interval of silence in the music. It’s amazing how this will transform you. Music has been said to tame a wild beast. It will do the same for the wild beast of your major upset.

    Six. Relax deeply. Massages, hot baths, and stretching exercises can all be used to unknot your muscles. It’s impossible to be unhappy when your body is completely relaxed. The rise of stress hormones in your body, create a fight-or-flight response in your nervous system. Systematic physical relaxation reverses this condition.

    Seven. Talk to an expert. Visit someone who can help you or read a book or hear an audio program by a stress reduction expert. As you open your mind to new information, you shift your stuck thinking and find new ways of dealing with the troubling situation.

    Using any of these simple remedies or a combination for burnout will help you get your perspective back.

    Saleem Rana is a psychotherapist in Denver, Colorado. If you’re interested in finding out about software that will reprogram your mind for total success, replacing burn-out situations with a fresh, empowering alternative, then go to http://theempoweredsoul.com/softwareletter.html

    Posted on Oct 27th, 2006

    Looking for some quick stress relief?

    Edward W. Smith, motivational speaker, author and TV show host, who specializes in quick tips on how to move your life ahead even faster, offers the following advice.

    It is helpful to understand that significant stress reduction can occur in minutes, you do not even have to leave the place where the stress is occuring.

    First, as soon as you feel stresses coming just say "Stop" to yourself. Saying "Stop" will actually help reduce the stress right away and give you a sense of being in control, which is what you need at that point. Next, breathe. Take a deep breath. Hold for 8 seconds and slowly let the air out.

    Then, reflect: Now that you’ve interfered with your automatic stress response you should be able to focus on the real problem or cause of your worry. Ask yourself "why do I leap to the most awful conclusions?" "What is the emotional hook that sets my stress reaction going?" "Am I exaggerating the threat?"

    Finally, choose: Decide what your real goal is and what’s the best solution to the problem. Then put together a plan of action or possible solutions that will deal with the situation. See don’t you feel better already?

    Contact Information
    Edward W. Smith, 201-568-0019, edsmith@stressmanagementarticles.com, www.brightmoment.com, PO box 8106, Englewood NJ 07631-8106

    Copyright Edward W. Smith 2005

    Edward W. Smith is the author of Sixty Seconds To Success, he produces and hosts the Bright Moment TV show, is a motivational speaker and is president of the Bright Moment Seminars.

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