'General Articles' Category Archive

Posted on Oct 12th, 2006

Among the hardest parts of living in the modern world is stress and anxiety. With worries about work, the environment, the economy, natural disasters, terrorism, and the general state of the world, it seems that there is no end to the number of things to worry about. Though we cannot control many of these things, they still weigh on our minds and cause us stress and anxiety. However, despite these concerns, we should try to avoid stress and anxiety.

Stress and anxiety are, at their hearts, mental problems. They are conditions in which the mind is racing and constantly circling around certain concerns. The concerns may be seemingly mundane, but the concerns keep recurring until they push out all the other thoughts in the brain and create their own towering mass of worry. And this tower is, in itself self-propagating simply because stress and anxiety tend to create themselves because stress and anxiety cause the mind to condition itself to stress and anxiety.

There is research to suggest that the mind gets used to stress and anxiety and, once it is conditioned, it will quickly return to stress and anxiety. In fact, there is some evidence that shows that stress conditioning may actually begin when we are too young to do anything about it. Children who face a great deal of stress will find their minds altered such that they will quickly return to a state of stress at the slightest provocation. It is almost as though the mind misses the state of stress and anxiety and wants to return to it once it has found the state.

Unfortunately, this creates serious problems not only for the mind, but also the body. Stress and anxiety put a great many demands on the human body. It causes headaches, high blood pressure, ulcers, sleep problems, immune system deficiencies and can even swell the joints, which can cause severe problems with conditions such as arthritis. As well, stress and anxiety can result in depression, memory problems, and even alcohol and drug abuse for those who suffer from stress and anxiety regularly. Thus, stress and anxiety are not merely problems of the mind, but they are problems of the mind that can cause problems in the body. The mind does, in surprising ways, control the body. And a mind that is overly taxed can lead to a body that is overly taxed.

Thus, you must understand that you can also control your mind. Stress and anxiety do not need to take over your mind. In fact, you can control how your mind responds to the problems that arise in life.

Remember that you can decide not to be stressed. You do not have to be anxious. You can change your mind and let things slide away. Yes, there are many things in this world to worry about. However, worrying about them will not change many aspects of the modern world. Constantly thinking about work, the environment, the economy, or politics will not change them. Instead, resolve to change things that you can change and do not worry about what you cannot control.

The thing to keep in mind is a sense of perspective. Yes, work is stressful, but do you need to worry about being attacked by a lion when you leave the office? When you go shopping for groceries, do you need to think about whether there will be a pack of marauding barbarians in the produce section? Hopefully, the answer is, "No." Thus, you do not have the same concerns as our forebears and you should keep that in mind. Life is pretty safe these days and the so-called "Age of Stress" is entirely of our own creation. We are stressed about things that we decide to be stressed about. And the things that we are stressed about really aren’t that important in the long-run scheme of things.

Stress and anxiety are, seemingly, enough to worry about on their own. So don’t fall into the trap of keeping them going. Keep life in perspective, keep yourself on an even keel and remember that you can control your own mind. If you can manage to do that, stress and anxiety to not need to take over your life.

Copyright 2005 Trevor Dumbleton

LowerYourStress.com is a categorized resource directory for everything to do with stress. Get a free ebook to help with your stress levels: http://www.loweryourstress.com/stress-book.html

Posted on Oct 11th, 2006

I recently received this e-mail message about stress management (author unknown)…

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A lecturer, when explaining stress management to an audience, raised a glass of water and asked, "How heavy is this glass of water?" Answers called out ranged from 20g to 500g. The lecturer replied, "The absolute weight doesn’t matter. It depends on how long you try to hold it."

"If I hold it for a minute, that’s not a problem. If I hold it for an hour, I’ll have an ache in my right arm. If I hold it for a day, you’ll have to call an ambulance. "In each case, it’s the same weight, but the longer I hold it, the heavier it becomes."

He continued, "And that’s the way it is with stress management. If we carry our burdens all the time, sooner or later, as the burden becomes increasingly heavy, we won’t be able to carry on." "As with the glass of water, you have to put it down for a while and rest before holding it again. When we’re refreshed, we can carry on with the burden."

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What burden can you put down to help you reduce stress? Notice that I did not ask if you had stress. I assume you do. The question is, what are you doing to manage or reduce it?

I’ll bet that you can identify something generating stress in your life right now that you’ve been carrying for a while … something that was probably stressing you a month ago, or even a year ago. So what are you prepared to do about it? Here are five tips to help you reduce stress.

1. Identify what is burdening you right now. What do you hate about your life? What are you tolerating? By stating what you hate or are putting up with in your present circumstances, you can then identify what you want. As you answer this question, consider each of the categories mentioned below. Make a thorough list and be specific. This list is for your eyes only, so spill onto paper whatever you hate about your present circumstances, without trying to sugar-coat how you are feeling. Here are some examples:

* Relationships: I hate feeling like I always have to be right. I hate how my son never wants to spend time with me.

* Health & Wellness: I hate being 20 pounds overweight. I hate getting so out-of-breath when I take the stairs. I hate that I am so stressed that I cannot fall asleep at night.

* Financial Health: I hate how I always defer my tax returns because I am so disorganized with my financial records. I hate how many tax deductions I forfeit because of my lousy record-keeping practices.

* Environment: I hate how my office is cluttered with piles of paper. I hate that I waste so much time looking for things. I hate how much money I waste because I have to buy something I have but cannot find. I hate that I cannot park my car in the garage because of all the junk stored in there.

* Work: I hate regularly working past 5 PM and on the weekends.

2. Deal with unresolved issues. Is there something in your past that you have not dealt with – psychological barriers, untreated disorders, unfinished business from your childhood, unresolved relationships, addictions, or depression? If so, seek professional assistance to clear a path for a new beginning. Without first dealing with these obstacles, you may sabotage your efforts or find major resistance to making the changes you desire.

3. De-clutter and create order. Creating order in your home and work environment may help you to gain clarity as you explore the horizon of some new directions in other areas of your life. Here’s my definition of clutter: Anything you own, possess, or do that does not enhance your life on a regular basis. It’s hard to make room for something new amidst all the clutter … whether that clutter exists in your physical environment, on your calendar, or in your head.

4. Move from complaints to solutions. Look at your list of things you hate (above), and design a vision around what you want and choose for the future. Create a chart that includes the complaints, solutions to achieve your vision, and projected dates of completion.

Tried everything and still cannot find a solution? Ask someone else to help you brainstorm a solution, or make peace with it and quit thinking of it as a problem.

Eliminate excuses that are undermining your vision. For example, if you feel like you have to work late, examine the excuses that are undermining your desire to leave the office by 5 PM. Are you staying late to catch up with e-mail or to meet deadlines? How can you eliminate the excuse? Build in time to handle those activities during regular work hours.

Commit time to take positive action. Carve out protected time for working on an important project that would otherwise not get done until the 11th hour (after hours or on the weekend). For large projects, break them into smaller "bite-sized" projects.

5. Get support as you change behaviors. In order to create new behaviors which will get and keep you at the enhanced level at which you wish to function, you may need support. An accountability partner or personal coach can help you:

* Reflect back what you say you want so you can hear yourself.

* Clarify what it will take to get you from where you are to where you want to be.

* Build in accountability check-ins (without judgment) around the actions you choose to take.

Identify the level of support you need in order to reach the goals you’ve identified, and then ask for help.

Copyright 2005 Kathy Paauw

Wouldn’t you love to stumble upon a secret library of ideas to help you de-clutter your life so you can focus on what’s most important? Kathy Paauw offers simple, yet powerful ideas, on how to manage your time, space, and thoughts for a more productive and fulfilling life.

Visit http://www.orgcoach.net

Posted on Oct 9th, 2006

Have you been feeling so stressful and almost losing your patience over anything? Everything seems to be shattered and you think that you cannot handle it anymore. This is definitely the perfect time to lighten the burden! Aromatherapy is a great conclusion. Some scented aromatherapy candles will help you out! What are aromatherapy candles anyway? Let’s find out about them in here.

However, before we jump into aromatherapy candles, it’s better to get to know what aromatherapy is and how it works. Aromatherapy is a body healing treatment that uses essential oils with certain scent or aroma with the intention of physical as well as psychological comfort.

Candles are just one of the varieties of aromatherapy diffusers. The aroma of essential oils will be dispersed by the candles and therefore will fill up an area or a room with the natural fragrance. You can also use other diffusers available in your household equipments like clay pot, electric heat, and fan. Of course each has different advantages and disadvantages. You can pick up what suits you best.

Aromatherapy Candles Benefits

One clear benefit you can get by using aromatherapy candles is that you won’t need batteries or electricity. Moreover, aromatherapy candles are not expensive. In short, it’s definitely economical. However, you should be careful with the risk of fire while using this candle diffuser as you do the same to other usual candles.

The scents or aroma you’ll get from aromatherapy candles are widely varied. You can ask for particular scents that offer certain help for your body and soul. For example, lavender is a recommended aroma for relaxing, while you can have jasmine for sensual atmosphere.

Where do you get these aromatherapy candles then? They’re absolutely easily found in beauty outlets, especially those that offer health and beauty treatment. You can also get them at online stores. Just search on what you need and you’ll soon get the answers! Live healthy with aromatherapy!

About The Author: Martha Carles knows aromatherapy very well. She has helped people with aromatherapy. You can visit her Website: MyAromatherapyGuide.com at http://www.myaromatherapyguide.com

Posted on Oct 8th, 2006

Voice: Bill!

Bill: I thought I heard a voice.

Voice: Bill! This is a Message from Heaven.

Bill: I don’t believe this. Is Heaven on speaking terms with the world?

Voice: Not often.

Bill: Why me?

Silence

Bill: Speak, Lord. I listen.

Voice: We created all things in the universe – the vast reaches of galaxies and the magnificent life on earth. Among all life forms, We endowed man with a superior intelligence, to recognize events around him and to fashion an immense host of feelings. Feelings warn him of danger, drive him to work and make him love and protect his children.

Bill: But, Lord, feelings drive us mad. We cry in sadness and weep in shame. We are burdened by guilt and goaded by ambition. Feelings torture us in our waking hours and chase us in our nightmares. Could you kindly take back this gift of feelings? Not wanting to hurt Your feelings…

Voice: When you were a young civilisation, you needed feelings.

Bill: Nobody could ever need all that pain.

Voice: Aeons ago, feelings guided men. Fear made him run away from the roar of the lion. And love prevented him from eating his young. But, across millenniums, you have grown and accumulated wisdom. Now, you really don’t need the crutch of painful feelings. You can walk free!

Bill: Save me from jests, Lord. How can mankind ever be rid of pain and fear, anger and jealousy? Those emotions take hold, even before we realise it.

Voice: Yes. That is the order of things – the way the system works. Your purpose in life is to live it fully against its immense odds. Left unsolved, those difficulties caused you pain, anger, or frustration. Emotions were the supreme gift, which forced you to solve those problems. But, across centuries, you have accumulated wisdom. That wisdom resides within you.

Bill: But, Lord, where does such wisdom reside within me?

Voice: Within your nerve cells. We gifted you with more than a hundred billion. Each cell perceives, remembers, recalls and recognizes. You see and remember the sunset to recognize the approach of night.

Bill: But, Lord, I feel anger and hatred, pain and disgust. Where do these reside?

Voice: Nerve cells fire to stir your emotions. If one fires, you feel dread. If another fires, you feel pleasure. Your own scientists discovered these age old secrets. The nerve cells of your limbic system lie at the core of your joy and delight, pain and anger. Their patterns of firing decide your feelings and emotions.

Bill: But, Lord, that limbic system drives us out of our minds.

Voice: The memories of your limbic system carry the experiences of all of living history. It recognizes the pattern of events in your environment and responds with fitting feelings. Those feelings drive you to action. It is called pattern recognition.

Bill: You mean pattern recognition moves us? One region recognizes events from the patterns in the environment. The limbic system recognizes events and triggers feelings. And the motor system recognizes the pattern of feelings and triggers actions?

Voice: Exactly. Pattern recognition. Most of your scientists still believe nerve cells compute. Actually, they don’t compute. They fire when they recognize patterns. But the views of science will change. Understanding and peace of mind will follow.

Bill: But, Lord, if the nerve cells merely recognize patterns and respond automatically, are we just automatons? Did you not grant us a free will?

Voice: Of course you have a free will, residing in your pre-frontal regions. Those regions recognize the whole picture. It is just that you are ruled by your limbic system, rather than the free and measured will expressed by your pre-frontal regions. Raw emotions, rather than dispassionate views of the whole guide you.

Bill: You mean this gift of wisdom is available only if my limbic system is switched off?

Voice: The limbic system can never be switched off. It is the final switching point for action. It is designed for your protection, to prevent your will from doing anything foolish. Many feelings compete there. But, the most powerful feeling rules. Pattern recognition again.

Bill: I don’t understand, Lord.

Voice: Will yourself to nudge your neighbour while standing in a crowded lift. Your will failed. Your elbow remained frozen in space. Why? Because it was improper. Opposed to the norms of your herd. Your limbic system decided and over ruled your will.

Bill: So, I really don’t have a free will! I am just an automaton, driven by my animal memories! This is unfair!

Voice: Cherish the love that protects you from harm. We gave you a guardian angel in your limbic system. But, that region is but a safety valve. You still have the broad road to wisdom in your pre-frontal regions.

Bill: But, Lord, fear and anger, shame and jealousy still torture us.

Voice: Your emotions give you partisan views of your environment. That is how intuition, the algorithm that controls your neural system, works. Intuition identifies a pattern by eliminating every other pattern, which does not fit the context. When you are angry, you cannot feel love for your opponent. Emotions blind you.

Bill: How can I control those emotions?

Voice: Wisdom. You have expanded your knowledge across millenniums. Thunder frightens you no more, because you know its true cause and effect. Your civilisation has expanded the boundaries of your knowledge and stilled your primitive fears and anxieties.

Bill: But that same civilisation has created new pressures and tensions. We fear earthquakes and typhoons, wars and nuclear bombs. Threatening patterns constantly surround us. Angry bosses and traffic hazards.

Voice: Your limbic system constantly triggers bodily responses to threatening events. Those adrenaline responses make you feel bad. But, you can cope. Just pump your stomach. The released adrenaline will be dissipated in minutes. Remember to pump your stomach, when you feel uneasy about something. Minor irritations will soon fail to bother you.

Bill: I tried that and it works. It makes me feel much calmer. But, Lord, stomach pumping only stills minor emotions. When I am faced with real problems, emotions still torture me. I am going to lose my job and that fills me with dread.

Voice: You can still even those emotions. They occur with distinct physical symptoms, which dramatize the emotions. When you become aware of the physical symptom of your emotion, you break the link. You weaken the emotion and destroy its power to dominate. Identify the tightness in your chest and the dread will fade away. You will see the event without the painful patina of the emotion. The loss of a job will not fill you with dread. You will see it as merely another problem to be solved by your wisdom.

Bill: But, how can I identify the physical symptom, when I am filled with dread?

Voice: That is why, across centuries, your sages have praised the benefits of prayer and meditation. Become still and aware of the workings of your mind. Explore the vast territories of your mind even as you explore the world. You will then become aware of emotions and their towering effects. You will learn to still them. Go forth and tell this to the world. That way lies your freedom from the primitive systems you inherited. That way lies peace on earth.

Bill: Peace has been in short supply on earth.

Voice: This Message will bring peace.

Bill: Will anybody listen?

Voice: Probably not.

Bill: Do you mind repeating the Message?

Abraham Thomas is the author of The Intuitive Algorithm, a book, which suggests that intuition is a pattern recognition algorithm. This leads to an understanding of the powerful forces that control your mind. The ebook version is available at http://www.intuition.co.in. The book may be purchased only in India. The website, provides a free movie and a walk through to explain the ideas.

Posted on Sep 17th, 2006

The day wasn’t going well already. You know how it is, you wake up in the morning with that migraine or the pounding headache in the back of your head. The kids are up at the crack of dawn (literally) and they keep coming into the bedroom to “help you” wake up. You fumble your way down stairs to a screaming chorus of, “Daddy, she won’t quit looking at me!” And then you have the old reliable “Hey! That’s my stuff!” And what are those comments without Back-up Plan ‘B’: “Hey! That’s my spot!” was bellowed out as the kids fought over the fluffy pillow in my office while watching Little House on the Prairie.

Now don’t get me wrong, my kids are great and I love them with all my heart but they do have their days. ;)

I wiped the sleep from my eyes as I fixed my morning lifeline, a steaming cup of Joe (which was destined to be spilled all over my desktop, keyboard and carpet!). After cleaning up the mess, I headed back into the kitchen but stopped half way there to remove the tiny doll shoe embedded in the bottom of my bare foot. The kids were at it again. That was it! I was at the boiling point and I could not tolerate this any longer!

I limped into the kitchen and there they were…lined up like little soldiers waiting to be disciplined. They looked as if they longed for, no, were begging for the stern discipline that they had coming…the bag of flour, the sugar bowl, and the salt shaker.

I threw the ingredients together in a powdery fury to the chorus of a clanking, ceramic bowl. There it was. The sun peeked through the partially drawn shades in the kitchen, gently embracing the soft, pale contents of the mixing bowl. The dough stared back at me, yearning to be thrown, rolled and disciplined.

I picked up the gooey substance and slammed it on the countertop! Pounding, pushing, pulling and kneading until it begged me for the rolling pin. I glanced at the built-in drawer under the oven and quickly produced a rolling pin. Without mercy I rolled, bunched up, and rolled again until the dough cried out, “I’ve had enough!”

For the ‘Coupe de Gras’, I placed the submissive heap in a bread pan and threw it into the oven. “There now”, I said to the unbaked loaf. “That wasn’t so bad, was it?” Forty-five minutes later I was rewarded with a delicious, toasted aroma that crept through the house like fog on a cool morning. Peace at last. The stress was gone. I felt great.

Next time you are stressed out, walk into the kitchen (or limp if you must), grab the bag of flour and its companions and administer a little discipline. You’ll feel better and be rewarded with a delicious, healthy treat!

Terry Stokely is a twenty-five year veteran of the baking industry. After being permenantly laid off in December of 2004, he enjoys spending time with his family and promoting his new ebook Home Baked Goodness with Bread, Rolls and Muffins. The new ebook, which he co-authored with his wife Dawn, can be found at http://www.homebakedfavorites.com

Posted on Sep 16th, 2006

This summer, get away, without going away. Take a mini vacation right in your own home. You owe it to yourself to practice the 3 R’s - recharge, relax and renew.

*Have the post office hold your mail.

*Turn off your cell phone. I know it’s hard, but let the answering machine pick up your calls.

*Turn off your computer. This is tough too, but you must take a break from business.

*Rent a couple of travel videos of places you’ve wanted to see. Don’t watch the news or regular TV shows.

*Rent a yoga, tai-chi, or meditation video.

*Arrange for catering or take-out delivery.

*Have plenty of fruits, healthy snacks and fresh drinks stocked.

*Get a relative to take the kids (you can reciprocate later).

*Take a long bubble bath and read this summer’s hottest novel.

*Arrange for a reputable massage therapist to make a house call.

*Send yourself a gift basket.

*Burn summer scented candles like Cantaloupe, Ocean Mist, Creamsicle, Hawaiian Paradise, Watermelon or Lily of the Valley.

We all need to get away for a short while and have time by ourselves or with a loved-one. Spending time relaxing can have an enormous effect on your well-being and reset your mind and body for increased productivity.

Deborah DeLuna is a professional Massage Therapist and has been in the luxury hotel and hospitality business for over 25 years. Her love of candles came out of using them everyday in business and her personal life. Visit her website at: http://www.createamood.com

Posted on Sep 12th, 2006

Do you ever have thoughts, feelings or impulses that attempt to hijack you?

These intense feelings and thoughts come out of nowhere. They show up when you least expect it. It might be anxiety, despair, loneliness, resentment, bitterness, jealousy, or anger. What is your response to this villain who is attempting to take over your mind, body and emotions?

You have two choices: Willingly become a prisoner, or assert yourself and regain control.

If you don’t want to be “hijacked,” turn the gun around and hold your thoughts captive. Use your inner voice to coach yourself, and regain control of your emotions. For quick relief, try these five instant "stress soothers:"

1.Change your perspective. You may not be able to control the source of your stress, but you can control the way you respond to it. Change your perspective by reframing what is happening around you. In other words, change your interpretation. Think about things in a new and positive way. If you’re on the verge of a meltdown, for example, because your spouse trashed the bathroom (and left wet towels on the floor) you could remind yourself that he was running late for work. If your co-worker lashes out at you, remind yourself that they are stressed because of deadlines, quotas, or something else beyond your control. In other words, try to be easy going and don’t take things personally. Whatever happens, strive to be cool, calm and collected. Rather than lashing out and reacting emotionally to difficult people and situations, diffuse your feelings by putting things in a proper perspective. Reframing takes conscious effort, but being flexible and easygoing will reduce your stress level.

2. Let it go. Be forgiving of others and yourself. There is a difference between conviction and condemnation. Conviction is a healthy form of guilt. If you make a mistake, admit it. Accept responsibility and strive to make things right. Learn from your mistakes. Once you’re dealt with things, let go of all guilt and regret. Don’t rehash, analyze, blame, or continue to ask why things happened the way they did. Don’t condemn yourself; let it go. Release your feelings and don’t apply any more negative energy to the situation. Remember that there is nothing you can do to change the past. Let go of your mistakes. Put it behind you and move on with a clean slate.

3. Realize that the only person you’re responsible for is yourself. Sometimes obvious solutions are overlooked by the people who need them the most. Your aunt can’t finish a sentence without hacking, and gasps for air after walking up the stairs. The problem? She refuses to stop smoking. There’s a job opening that’s perfect for your unemployed neighbor with seven kids. The problem? He refuses to apply. The man is crippled by feelings of inadequacy and failure. To make matters worse, he refuses to get help for his emotional problems. As much as we want to help other people, they must want to help themselves. We can’t talk them into it. In the long run, individuals must be personally motivated to change. Don’t be stressed out about people, circumstances or events that are beyond your control. If someone refuses to get the help they need, realize that it’s not your responsibility. The only person you’re responsible for is yourself.

4. Keep a positive mental outlook. You can be resilient to stress in everyday life by thinking positively. Be happy, optimistic, upbeat and adventurous. Let setbacks roll off your back. Change the way you look at problems until you find the best solution. Live your life as a winner, and you’ll perform at your best. Be convinced that you can do anything you set your mind to. No matter what the situation, strive to be cool, calm and collected. Have a good sense of humor about yourself. If all of this seems Pollyannaish to you, consider a person who dwells on negative thoughts, beliefs and attitudes. It will take them twice as long to succeed (if that happens at all.) Pessimism enhances stress, and tends to make things worse.

5. Be assertive when you need to be. It is important to deal with problems immediately and directly. Speak up for yourself. It may not be appropriate to vent your frustrations at work, but you can confide in a spouse, friend or family member. In other words, express your feelings in a safe environment. Don’t stuff your feelings, or attempt to de-stress by overeating, smoking or drinking excessively. It’s important to be in touch with your feelings and to acknowledge them. Express your thoughts clearly and with conviction. Look at people when you talk to them. You can be assertive and still be considerate of the feelings of others.

Realistically, there will be always be times when we fall prey to negative emotions. We can train ourselves to recognize these feelings and address them, before they “hijack” us and take us prisoner. Increased awareness and better coping skills will put us on the road to less stress, every time.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR. Nicky Vanvalkenburgh shares "stress reduction" secrets that will turbo charge your health, wealth, work, and relationships. Check out her website (and get a free e-book) at http://www.20minutestolessstress.com/

Posted on Sep 11th, 2006

Some men have a difficult time in managing their stresses and anxieties. It can be difficult but there are ways to handle your stresses and anxieties. Here is a brief list of techniques that men can use to help manage their every day stresses and anxieties.

Sometimes, we get stressed when everything happens all at once. When this happens, a person should take a deep breathe and try to find something to do for a few minutes to get their mind off of the problem. A person could take a walk, listen to some music, read the newspaper or do an activity that will give them a fresh perspective on things.

Another technique that is very helpful is to have a small notebook of positive statements that make us feel good. Whenever you come across an affirmation that makes you feel good, write it down in a small notebook that you can carry around with you in your pocket. Whenever you feel anxious, open up your small notebook and read those statements.

When facing a current or upcoming task that overwhelms you with a lot of anxiety, the first thing you can do is to break the task into a series of smaller steps. Completing these smaller tasks one at a time will make the stress more manageable and increases your chances of success.

In dealing with your anxieties, a person should learn to take it one day at a time. Instead of focusing on exaggerated assumptions that may or may not happen, focus on the present and rely on the facts of the present situation.

Our anxieties and stresses can sometimes get the best of us, however there are many helpful resources available to us. It might take some hard work and persistence, but it is possible to find those answers in managing your anxieties.

Stan Popovich is the author of "A Layman’s Guide to Managing Fear” an easy to read book that presents a overview of techniques that are effective in managing persistent fears and anxieties. For additional information go to: http://www.managingfear.com

Posted on Sep 10th, 2006

Stress management is an absolute requirement when we get into a mode of defending various beliefs and opinions. We can get to a point where we would rather die than be proven wrong. This mindset can place us in a self-imposed box that closes us off from the wonders that Life offers. However, we can give ourselves immediate relief.

The ego is composed of beliefs, attitudes and the resulting energies. The ego believes these positions are necessary for its’ survival. The ego believes it is right and everything else is wrong.

This variation from reality produces a tremendous amount of stress. Management of this discomfort becomes necessary if we’re going to have a meaningful life. We can make amazing progress by simply letting go of the idea that we have the only right opinion.

Right or wrong depends on context. From the context of a computer programmer, it’s right to spend all day in front of a computer. From the context of a sales person, it’s right to spend all day saying good things about their product.

Stress management becomes necessary when we lose track of the above. You can experience relief when you recognize the above. Socrates said that we all believe we’re doing the right thing.

This right and wrong context extends to all life situations. In the grand scheme of things all of us are divine. In every day living we can simply observe ourselves with love and silently give ourselves approval. Then we can observe other people with love and silently give them approval.

It’s easy to read the above paragraph. However, the above is a powerful tool for living. If you focused on the above as your basic principle for living, your life experience would go through the roof.

Copyright 2006 by Jim Kitzmiller

Jim Kitzmiller conducts self improvement workshops and retreats. He is the author of a home study stress management class.

Posted on Sep 9th, 2006

Here’s how to do it. We can observe ourselves. There are ancient meditation practices based on simple self observation.

We take a moment and just notice ourselves. This can be done by noticing the feelings in our bodies. Notice our breathing. Notice the inhale and exhale. You can do this as a regular practice as a powerful stress management technique. You can get fast relief when you find yourself in stressful situations.

If you wish, you can listen to a free audio meditation on self observation. This will help you get started. After you’ve used the audio for a while, you can practice self observation on your own.

What does this have to do with the ego? When we observe "our self" we are usually observing the ego. This observation tends to help us realize that we are not really the ego. This is a very powerful step in stress management. It skyrockets the way we experience life.

You can practice this throughout the day. You might decide to walk very slowly and observing yourself when you’re walking. This greatly increases your awareness and brings you into the Now.

Over time this can be amazingly relaxing practice of stress management. It brings amazing relief. You’ll get more insights about life. You can step out of life’s challenges. You can return to the challenges with a refreshed and relaxed state of mind.

Copyright 2006 by Jim Kitzmiller

Jim Kitzmiller conducts self improvement workshops and retreats. He is the author of a home study stress management class.

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